Antibiotics Does Not Work For Cold And Flu Symptoms

Antibiotics Does Not Work For Cold And Flu Symptoms

Most of us will have a cold this autumn or winter, and some of us will have the flu. Here’s how to look after yourself if these viruses affect you.

Colds and flu are caused by viruses. There are more than 200 common cold viruses and three types of flu virus, with many different strains, so they’re hard to avoid.

These viruses can be spread through droplets that are coughed and sneezed out by an infected person. The viruses can also be transferred via a person’s fingers or surfaces, such as door handles, if there are infected droplets on them.

The virus enters the body via the nose or eyes. If you have infected droplets on your fingers and you touch your eyes or nose, the virus can enter your body.

Cold symptoms

The main symptoms of winter cold and flu bugs are:

  • coughing
  • sneezing
  • blocked nose
  • sore throat
  • headache
  • a slight temperature

If these are the only symptoms you have, it’s unlikely that your GP will be able to do anything.

You may want to visit your local pharmacy, where you can get advice on how to manage the symptoms and buy over-the-counter medicine.

More about treating colds and treating flu

When to see a doctor

While most bugs will run their course without doing any real harm, Dr Shah says there are certain cases when you or your child should see a GP. These includes:

  • if you or your child have a chronic condition – such as asthmadiabetes or heart disease
  • if you have a very high temperature and feel ill – for example, if you also have an unusually severe headache or abdominal pain
  • if your child is vomiting but does not have diarrhoea, or has a rash in addition to the fever
  • if your child stops drinking and is unusually lethargic
  • if your child’s fever doesn’t respond to paracetamol or ibuprofen

Babies, as well as older and frailer people, should get help if they’re unwell.

Always contact your GP, health visitor, practice nurse or nurse practitioner if either:

  • your child has other signs of illness, as well as a raised temperature
  • your baby’s temperature is 38C (100.4F) or higher (if they’re under three months)
  • your baby’s temperature is 39C (102.2F) or higher (if they’re three to six months)

You can also visit Asset Chemist  online doctor service

information from NHS  Choice
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